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20121222
20121230
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CSPAN 9
CNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
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English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
CBS
Dec 23, 2012 8:00am EST
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 10:30pm EST
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 1:00pm EST
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CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can happen in politics? and how can
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
CNN
Dec 27, 2012 4:00pm PST
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront." is chuck hagel's nomination dead on arrival? now hagel, the former republican senator and vietnam war hero, could be president obama's choice to be the next defense secretary. but today he's under attack by a group of gay republicans known as the log cabin republicans. now, this full-page ad said hagel's wrong for the job because of a statement he made back in 1998, when he questioned whether, in his words, a quote, openly, aggressively gay nominee could be an effective u.s. ambassador. now, a lot's changed since then, and hagel has since apologized, though that has also come under attack for his somewhat controversial beliefs on israel, iraq, and iran. are these attacks justified, or is he just the latest political target in an ugly game of gotcha politics. "outfront" tonight, our all-star panel. ryan, let me start with you. let's look at chuck hagel's credentials. a vietnam war veteran, two purple hearts,
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 5:30pm PST
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >>it lies on all of us. l of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our chilen. >> ifill: the prident has skedhe committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i don't worry
CBS
Dec 21, 2012 5:30pm PST
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CBS
Dec 28, 2012 7:00am PST
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 5:00am PST
of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he
MSNBC
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am PST
't it their deficit in large part deficit? >> of course, but they have political amnesia. ideology is the science of idiots. here's one of these moments where when you live inside the box and refuse to look at empirical evidence, refuse to understand history to show us how economies work, how tax cuts or increases affect populations, then they are going to follow this line of idiocy over their own, i think, political cliff. and the partisanship is going to wreak tremendous havoc on the republican party in the upcoming elections. >> we have limited time. i want to go back to john harwood. is there a time here, john, when we're going to see the markets start to react or are we expecting most traders to wait until after the first to make big decisions? >> i think that's when they reacted. if we go over the cliff, even for a couple of days, you're going to see a reaction. i think at the end of the day you will see action if we go over the cliff for a couple of days, because i don't agree with jonathan that they are immune to public opinion. it is going to take a while for it to kick in. a lot of the
MSNBC
Dec 27, 2012 3:00am PST
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 9:00am EST
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm EST
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
CNBC
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm EST
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> about three minutes left and we're closing out the week near the lows of the week. this is the dow this week, and generally the hopes for a fiscal cliff resolution have been coming down here, and nowhere has it been more evident than just in the last hour. let me show you today's chart of the dow. early on we had the rumors that maybe the president had some new scaled down proposal to offer at the white house meeting, and then our eamon javers reported that that is not the case, and that's what took this market lower, and we're near the lows, down 138 points. my friend ben willis, you've been one of the more optimistic traders on the floor, optimistic we'd get a resolution. willing to buy the dips and now this happened. >> the chart you just showed, mr. obama not buying anything newnew. anybody buying the dips had to puke them out. that's exactly what happened. professional traders, most of which have been in this week, most others on the s
CNN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm PST
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> breaking news tonight. retired general norman schwartzkof has died. it reads, "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american president, and one of the great military leaders of his generation. a distinguished member of that long, great line hailing from west point, general norm schwarz kof epitomizes our nation. more than that, he was a good and decent man and a dear friend. barbara and i send our condolences to his wife, brenda, and his wonderful family." very sad news for the country. >>> we start our second half of our show with the other stories we're watching tonight. former president george w.h. bush remains in intensive care at
MSNBC
Dec 26, 2012 4:00am PST
's a science. >> you say it's so -- the worst part of it is that you go in, you think that people are looking at you. and then you start acting really weird. and then they stop you. >> you're pair reside. don't be paranoid, but then they are, actually, because you've been stopped at the door and they want to see your receipt. >> do you think you're being profiled? >> no. >> because he's wearing that jacket. they're profiling people -- >> now i order online so i don't have to worry about it. you can shop in your underwear. it's great. i was born for the internet. also you also like when he talks about how to lose weight. i love the simplicity of it and you say if you don't want to be fat, stop eating and you say that you have credibility on this for a good reason. >> there is a difference between, and you have to know this difference. what you want and what you want to want. i know someone when i first met her 20 years ago, she made a joke about being on a diet, but she was always on a diet and i saw her 15 years later and made a joke about her diet. after 15 years, you are still on a diet, yo
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 10:00pm PST
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
CNBC
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> street talk time. let's do it. two pieces of news today. 55.5 million. unfortunately that's about half of what the company paid for it. also, all things reporting rim's famous nokia. $65 million up front and then continued on. rim settled patent issues with nokia last week. >>> barnes & noble higher despite posting holiday sales over or below expectations. it is rising because british company pearson buys a 5% stake in the nook business for $89.5 million. after this barnes & noble owns about 78.2 of the nook bis. microsoft remaining 16.8. lsi rising after they start it with a buy rating and a $9 target rate. lsi will get increasing demand for stores and networking traffic. they prefer lsi over marvell which got whacked with a huge patent. finally, they're rising after they get a std test for chlamydia and gonorrhea. it sees the launch of the product as the key driver for the stock. this he have a $43 target. that is 9 and change above today's price or something. >> that was so fast, brian. it was almost like one of those disc
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
CNBC
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. gee you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street," live from the financial capital on the world. the opening bell set to ring on that balcony in a couple minutes there the big board, west virginia university and syracuse university, the football teams playing in the new era pinstripe bowl at yankee stadium this saturday. i know melissa is going p. >> for sure. we are carpooling, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should tru
ABC
Dec 28, 2012 1:40am PST
the hangover cure. drumroll. it's asparagus. according to the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract many -- it helps your liver cells and it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ pledge your love with techs and tweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ even if you're not a hunk you can always text your junk ♪ ♪ that's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪ ♪ like the vampire said the economy sure sucks ♪ ♪ that's the paula polka everyone sing. ♪ that's the paula polka ♪ we love to read your comments always in such a large amount ♪ ♪ it's good to spell and punctuation and grammar don't count ♪ ♪ you like us, we like you, it's the facebook polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night, you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so grab your "wo
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)